Night out at Gion (Kyoto)

Breakfast at Kohikan > Arashimaya (嵐山) > Bamboo Grove > Nonomiya Shrine > Randen Arashiyama Station > LunchGetting to Torokko-Kameoka Station > Torokko-Kameoka Station > Sagano Scenic Railway > Torokko-Saga Station > Gion

A snack store

We decided to be a little more adventurous after the Sagano Scenic/Romantic train ride, and so hoped on bus #206 (you can board #100 too) from Kyoto Station to Gion. On the bus to Gion, there were some interesting sights that were uniquely Japanese.

Gion (Kyoto)
The view from the bus towards Gion

Being the traditional entertainment district that it is, Gion is the more happening part of town with restaurants, snack shops, and shopping of almost everything. Gion is known as Kyoto’s most famous geisha district. Unfortunately we did not get to see any during the time there.

Regardless, Gion is packed with bars, restaurants and traditional tea houses so it will not be boring just being there to soak up the atmosphere. If you want to visit anything specific, you can check this out [Walking in Gion] to start planning your route.

Gion (Kyoto)
Restaurants, eateries and stores selling snacks along the streets of Gion

There wasn’t any specific route or places we especially wanted to go, so we ended up roaming the streets and went wherever our feet brought us. We passed by Gion Shirakawa, as well as shops selling traditional Japanese snacks and souvenirs.

Gion Shirakawa
Gion Shirakawa from a distance
Gion (Kyoto)
The streets in the evening and shops selling Japanese souvenirs
 Gion (Kyoto)
Japanese crafts
 Gion (Kyoto)
Hello Kitty or My Melody?
Gion (Kyoto)
Display of Japanese Umbrellas
Gion (Kyoto)
The streets of Gion when night falls
Gion (Kyoto)
Shopping malls abound
 Gion (Kyoto)
ZARA
 Gion (Kyoto)
For those who love their Hello Kitty

We ended visiting Gion for 2 nights, as on one of the days we wanted to go to the famous Nishiki Market, which is apparently a little further about 100 meters north of Shijo Street from Teramachi Street, but we somehow missed it. Still it was fun exploring Teramachi Street and Shinkyogoku Street (that and the malls).


Teramachi Street

The first night we were at Gion we stumbled on Teramachi Street - a historical street in Kyoto containing an array of shops and services, both traditional and modern. Teramachi literally means "Temple Town", reflecting the large number of temples moved there during Toyotomi Hideyoshi's remodeling of Kyoto in the 16th century.

Teramachi Street
Teramachi Street

Teramachi Street is one of the two streets form the heart of Kyoto’s main shopping district. The eastern street, known as Shinkyogoku. We explored Shinkyogoku Street on the next night we were in Kyoto. [Our Teramachi Street Experience]

Before we explored Teramachi Street, we had dinner at Issen Yoshoku, a quirky Japanese eatery with mannequins for company (not to mention some pretty not so innocent depictions ahem...)!  [Dinner at Issen Yoshoku Experience]


Shinkyogoku Street

Shinkyogoku Street
Shinkyogoku Street

Shinkyogoku Street, also known as Shinkyogoku Shopping Arcade,  is the second oldest shopping strip after Asakusa Nakamise in Tokyo which established in 1872. It is one of the one of the two streets form the heart of Kyoto’s main shopping district; the other being Teramachi Street. Shinkyogoku Street is the perfect place to get that souvenir. [Our Shinkyogoku Street Experience]

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When travel collides with a byte, a unit of information made up of bits, TravelBytez is formed: snippets of ramblings on travel, food, shopping, living and anything else that comes to mind.
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